The meaning of a word is determined by its history. According to Boorstin, „divergences” and „dissents” differ, as the latter comes from the Latin dis et sentire, which literally means feeling separated from others. On the other hand, disagreement means having a lack of consensus or having a different or contradictory opinion on a subject. Because, therefore, these words differ historically in their meaning. In short, disagreements and disagreements have different meanings because they exert different pressures, which have different consequences and are historically separate. Initially, the genocide in Sudan could not be fully or not helped at all. As Boorstin says, „the two differences are the cancer of his [democracy],” and it`s obvious in this case, because Americans have chosen to contradict each other and feel separated from this problem, which has only made things worse. Boorstin recognizes the differences between disagreements and disagreements in a way that makes it clear that dissent is unproductive for our society`s conflicts, while differences of opinion serve as a first step to resolution. While Brown v. Board of Education is an example of how disagreements have led to improvements, the issue of genocide in Sudan has shown how a large amount of disagreement and a lack of discussion, disagreement and knowledge can prove to be a „cancer” of a democracy.

This is what happens all over the world in governments: normally, people in First World countries do not agree on the laws, but they adapt them until they are in third world countries, citizens oppose the law oppose the law, and the nation is polarized. Because of the different and complex consequences that these notions have on a society, words have different meanings. Given Lukashenko`s control over the system – he will not allow independent observers – it remains unlikely that Tichanovskaya will win directly, but recent weeks have fuelled the fire of growing dissent. Racial wars, military tactics against citizens, repressed dissent. From another point of view, words produce different effects for small groups. „People who disagree have an argument, but people who decide have a quarrel,” says the author, while distinguishing the impact of words. In this context, people who disagree are more likely to discuss to reach a consensus, to find a better solution. . . .